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25 November 2014

Free Reading Lessons for Bob Books Set 1, Book 4

Today we're teaching Bob Books Set 1, Book 4. This book is called "Mac" and technically it only introduces one new sound -- the sound made by the letter B.

Now, the nice thing about the letter B is that it's consistent; it only makes one sound. It isn't noisy like those vowels that are always saying something new an unexpected.

So why did I say that technically the book only introduces on new sound? Because it also begins to use the word the in sentences. Before, we only read the word in the The End on the last page, which didn't even feel like reading.

So the question becomes what to do about this. Do we teach it as a sight word? If yes, does that get confusing? And the isn't actually a sight word. There's a rule for it. If we don't teach it as a sight word, isn't it too complicated of a rule to introduce?

I have gone back and forth and back and forth over this. Book 4 has caused me no end of angst. But it hast to be dealt with -- a decision must  be made -- because future books are going to continue using the word.

This time around, I went ahead and taught the rule. I sort of held my breath. Was this child going to freak out about a sound combination -- a veritable digraph, even?

Thankfully, we pulled it off without any issues. I briefly taught him the concept of the hard-th sound, but without giving him an extensive word list. Instead, I gave him one word, and he'll collect more words (which we'll add to the card) as we go.

So here are the lessons:

Lesson One
  • Introduce new sound: b
  • Build some words and practice sounding them out: bad, bat, bam, bad
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 4 ("Mac") pp. 1-3


My binder card looked like this:



Lesson Two
  • Introduce new digraph: hard-th
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 4 ("Mac") pp. 4-6

Here's my binder card for Lesson Two:



Lesson Three
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 4 ("Mac") pp. 7-ff


Lesson Four
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 4 ("Mac") pp. 1-3


Lesson Five
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 4 ("Mac") pp. 4-ff





20 November 2014

Free Reading Lessons for Bob Books Set 1, Book 3

By the time your student reaches Bob Books Set 1, Book 3, he is well on his way to finding his rhythm in this thing called reading lessons. He knows what to expect now, and he is ready to tackle new sounds as they come along.

He may also need help smooshing his sounds, and the best thing you can do is continue to model it -- not doing it for him, but it is good to know when to step in and help -- so that he knows what smooshing sounds like.

In this book, we also meet Dot, who is my favorite Bob Books character.

So here are the lessons:


Lesson One
  • Introduce new sounds: h, hard-s
  • Build some words and practice sounding them out: hat, had, has
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 3 ("Dot") pp. 1-3


My binder card looked like this:




Lesson Two
  • Introduce new sounds: hard-g, r
  • Build some words and practice sounding them out: dog, rag, God
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 3 ("Dot") pp. 4-5


If your student needs it, you can also remind him that a says its name when it's a word all by itself.

Here's my binder card for Lesson Two:




Lesson Three
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 3 ("Dot") pp. 6-ff


Lesson Four
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 3 ("Dot") pp. all


Can you believe it? Three books done already! Don't forget to add the title to your student's 100 Books Chart.





18 November 2014

Free Reading Lessons for Bob Books Set 1, Book 2

Some people insist on teaching through the Bob Books with a sight word method. I, on the other hand, am emphasizing the phonics approach. I try very hard not to do sight words because I believe that English makes a lot of sense, and our students deserve to understand that from the very beginning.

The wonderful thing about Bob Books is that they lend themselves to the phonics approach, only introducing a few sounds in each book. This makes them perfect for our purposes.

So here are the lessons:


Lesson One
  • Introduce new sounds: c, d
  • Build some words and practice sounding them out: cat, and, mad, Mac
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 2 ("Sam") pp. 1-3


My binder card looked like this:




Lesson Two
  • Introduce new word: O.K.
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 2 ("Sam") pp. 4-ff

I did not make a binder card for the word O.K. I have in the past for other students, and if you think your student needs it, make one! But this student totally got reading the initials as letters, so I felt I didn't need to ask him to review it.


Lesson Three
  • Build some words with the sounds you've already taught: at, mat, sat, cat
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 2 ("Sam") pp. 1-4


Lesson Four
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 2 ("Sam") pp. 5-ff


And there you have it! Another book completed. Don't forget to add the title to your student's 100 Books Chart.





15 November 2014

Free Reading Lessons for Bob Books Set 1, Book 1

These lessons are really important because they're the very first lessons I ever give a new reading student. Before this, my students have only played with the alphabet. This is different. This is a formal lesson.

So the first thing I do is introduce the student to the TRwBB Binder System. I'm not saying that I explain every little thing -- that is far too many details for a little person. But I explain that this is his special reading binder, just for him. In it, we're going to keep all the letter sounds he learns along the way.

Which brings us to the idea that letters make sounds. I consider this a prerequisite for reading, and yet it's still a good idea to remind him. Some letters, like m, only make one sound. This is like some animals. But other letters, like the noisier animals, make lots of different sounds. Don't be surprised if you learn a number of sounds for a letter.

We start the first day with the goal of reading a few pages of Bob Books Set 1 Book 1, but that doesn't always happen. Sometimes, we get carried away with other things, like playing with the new sounds we're learning.

With Son O., however, we did get there.

It took us four lessons to get through the entire book. The first three lessons were our first time through the book, and the last lesson was a review day. He read through the whole book that day! That was exciting and encouraging for both of us.

I always have my students read each book twice, unless they flew through the book without mistakes on the first try. I find that this review time helps solidify the sounds they have learned before moving on.

So here are the lessons:

Lesson One
  • Introduce new sounds: short-a, m, soft-s, t
  • Build some words and practice sounding them out: at, Mat, mat, sat, Sam
  • Read: Set 1, Book 1 ("Mat") pp. 1-3

My binder card looked like this:


Lesson Two
  • Introduce new sounds: short-o, n
  • Build some words and practice sounding them out: on, man, tan
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 1 ("Mat") pp. 4-5

My binder card looked like this:


Lesson Three
  • Introduce new phrase: The End
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 1 ("Mat") pp. 6-ff

I never spend a lot of time on "The End" for the first book. I simply tell the child that this is what it says, and the child remembers. We'll work on reading "The" shortly, but I don't like to introduce the th sound during the first few days of lessons.

Lesson Four
  • Review appropriate sections in the binder.
  • Read: Set 1, Book 1 ("Mat") pp. all

And there you have it! The very first book is finished. Don't forget to add the title to your student's 100 Books Chart.